Mini-Reviews of Recent Reads: Milk Fed & All the Birds on the Sky

Milk Fed by Melissa Broder

Categories: Contemporary Fiction, Literary Fiction

First Publication Date: February 2, 2021


I received an advance copy via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.


Milk Fed is the story of a young Jewish woman who goes through an emotional detox from her mother and meets a woman at a local yoghurt place. She has internalized fatphobia and a severe eating disorder, controlling every minute or her life so as not to get fat. Serious trigger warnings here for eating disorder, self-harm, toxic family relationships and homophobia. I loved the writing in this book, Melissa Broder’s sharp, dry and sarcastic tone makes anything she writes a delight to read. However, I found this book quite uninspired at times and the ending left me thinking – that’s it? Perhaps I’m seriously burned-out from the Disaster Woman trope (as I’ve mentioned a few times), but watching things unfold made me cringe so hard. I just found myself not really wanting to pick this up very often, but at least it was a quick read, and it’s definitely a bold story.

Rating: 3 out of 5.

All the Birds in the Sky by Charlie Jane Anders

Categories: Fantasy, Sci-Fi

First Publication Date: January 26, 2016


I had a bit of a mixed experience with All the Birds in the Sky, namely that I loved the world building, thought the whimsical touches really worked for it and the humor was on-point, I even loved some of the characters, but also found myself skimming through the book a lot and I did not care for the ending. This is an adult novel that felt very often to me like middle grade, with its on-the-nose themes, which I did not really enjoy. A lot happens in this 300-page novel, making it feel much longer and be quite an immersive read, so if the writing style works for you, I think this will be a very interesting read!

Rating: 3 out of 5.

SciFi Books for People Who Think They Don’t Like SciFi

Hello readers!

There are several reasons why a lot of readers shy away from SciFi: maybe you think it’s dry and boring and too tech-y; maybe you would rather read character-driven, emotional stories; maybe you prefer down-to-earth books and can’t relate to fantastical worlds; maybe you associate it only with alien-shooting and wars between planets (which, fair).

BUT. I brought the good stuff today! SciFi can go in so many directions, and doesn’t have to be the dry action-packed books that are so stereotypical of the genre. If you think you don’t like SciFi, maybe you just haven’t found a book that suited your personal reading tastes – there’s really all kinds of SciFi out there!

I’ve compiled a list with some fun, light-hearted stuff, some character-driven and emotional reads, some thrillers, and some cozy reads, too. Maybe you’ll find something that fits your reading taste!

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The Power Naomi Alderman Dark Matter Blake Crouch neverworld wake marisha pessl

The Power by Naomi Alderman / Goodreads

This is a bit of a divisive read, but I really enjoyed it! In The Power, women wake up one day with the power of electricity, shifting the power balance and changing who gets to lead the world. If you like dystopias, you might enjoy this Women’s Prize for Fiction winner! Continue reading

Review: Frankissstein by Jeanette Winterson

frankissstein jeanette winterson

Rating: ★★★☆☆

Categories: Literary Fiction, Science Fiction

Goodreads

In Brexit Britain, a young transgender doctor called Ry is falling in love – against their better judgement – with Victor Stein, a celebrated professor leading the public debate around AI.

Meanwhile, Ron Lord, just divorced and living with Mum again, is set to make his fortune launching a new generation of sex dolls for lonely men everywhere.

Across the Atlantic, in Phoenix, Arizona, a cryonics facility houses dozens of bodies of men and women who are medically and legally dead… but waiting to return to life.

But the scene is set in 1816, when nineteen-year-old Mary Shelley writes a story about creating a non-biological life-form. ‘Beware, for I am fearless and therefore powerful.’ Continue reading

Review: The Memory Police, by Yōko Ogawa

the memory police yoko ogawaRating: ★★★★☆

Categories: Literary Fiction, Dystopia

Goodreads

The Memory Police tells the story of our unnamed narrator, a novelist living in an unnamed island where things disappear. One day many years before, it had been hats, and then ribbons, and those things were not missed. The islanders forgot about them and moved on. The disappeared things become slowly more important, and the islanders forget and move on after each one – but not everyone forgets what has been lost, and the Memory Police make sure those people are taken away. When our narrator finds out her editor and friend is one of those people who are unable to forget, she knows she must hide him, lest he end up like her mother – dead. Continue reading

Review: This is How You Lose the Time War, by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone

this is how you lose the time war amal el-mohtar max gladstoneRating: ★★★★★

Genres: Science Fiction, Literary Fiction

Goodreads

In This is How You Lose the Time War, Red is fighting the war on the side of the Commandant. She is the most lethal agent and is used to winning. The only one who could possibly beat her is Blue,an agent working for the Garden, and Red knows her signature well. As they try to sabotage each other’s mission, and send taunting letters to each other, the unthinkable happens: Red and Blue start to bond. No one must know of this treason. And yet, how could they ever survive it? Continue reading

Review: Recursion, by Blake Crouch

recursion blake crouch

Rating: ★★★☆☆

Genres: Science Fiction, Thriller

Goodreads

That’s what New York City cop Barry Sutton is learning as he investigates the devastating phenomenon the media has dubbed False Memory Syndrome—a mysterious affliction that drives its victims mad with memories of a life they never lived.

That’s what neuroscientist Helena Smith believes. It’s why she’s dedicated her life to creating a technology that will let us preserve our most precious memories. If she succeeds, anyone will be able to re-experience a first kiss, the birth of a child, the final moment with a dying parent. 

As Barry searches for the truth, he comes face-to-face with an opponent more terrifying than any disease—a force that attacks not just our minds but the very fabric of the past. And as its effects begin to unmake the world as we know it, only he and Helena, working together, will stand a chance at defeating it.

But how can they make a stand when reality itself is shifting and crumbling all around them? Continue reading

eARC Review: The Fever King, by Victoria Lee

the fever king victoria lee

Rating: ★★★☆☆

Genres: Science Fiction, Young Adult, LGBT+

Goodreads

I have received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

The Fever King is the story of Noam, the son of two refugees who’s trying to keep what is left of his family together. When he’s struck with magic virus, a sickness that has wiped out most of the previously-US population, he’s the only survivor and wakes up in a mass of dead bodies. But now that Noam has survived magic, he has a power of his own – a rare, powerful magic that the government wants to use. Continue reading

eARC Review: The Psychology of Time Travel, by Kate Mascarenhas

The Psychology of Time Travel Kate Mascarenhas

Rating: ★★★★★

Genres: Science Fiction

Goodreads / Amazon

I have received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

In the first chapter of this book, we are in 1967 and time travel has just been invented. The four scientists are excited, hopeful, full of dreams. But when one of them, Barbara, goes into a manic depressive episode that is broadcast on a BBC interview, she never again is able to time travel or go back to her work. Fast forward to 2017 and Barbara’s granddaughter Ruby is just now finding out more details about her past and why her mom hates time travel. Then, it’s 2018 and a body has been discovered in a room locked from the inside, shot to death.

Yes, all those things are connected. Continue reading

Review: Six Wakes, by Mur Lafferty

six wakes mur laufferty

Rating: ★★★★★

Genres: Science Fiction, Mystery

Goodreads / Amazon

I got the recommendation for this book from SFF Yeah! podcast and it sounded so, so good I couldn’t help getting it almost immediately.

The crew of a ship wakes up with no memory of the last 25 years. They are all clones, woken up all at the same time to a gruesome scene: all their previous clones drenched in blood, floating around the spaceship. They were all murdered, and now the murderer is newly awaken, with no memory of doing it. Ian, the Intelligent Artificial Network, is down. Continue reading

Mini-Review: Illusive, by Emily Lloyd-Jones

illusive emily lloyd-jones

Rating: ★★★★★

Genres: Science Fiction, Thriller, Young Adult

Goodreads Amazon

This wonderful gem is like Ocean’s Eleven met the X-men and had a Young Adult book child. When a dangerous viral disease swept across Earth, a vaccine brought the cure. But it also brought side effects – superpowers. These people are called immune, and Ciere is one of them – she can change her appearance to whatever she wants, whenever she wants.

I highly recommend this book, this heist story is so much fun, with lots of action and a tiny bit of romance! I really enjoyed this and can’t wait to read the second book!